Midas

Midas

MIDAS XL8
October 2006—This open-architecture, cross-platform, audio control/distribution system for handling all audio aspects of a live show features a 72-fader/96kHz system with the reliability of distributed pathways, redundant routers, dual stage boxes and multiple DSP engines for fail-safe operation. MidasNET protocol provides low, ideal-for-IEM latency. Expandable I/O stage boxes each include 24 remoteable mic preamps with three analog mic splits linked to 96 channel inputs (plus 16 mic/line aux ins). www.midasconsoles.com


MIDAS XL8
September 2006—The XL8 Live Performance System from Midas provides an open-architecture audio control/distribution system for handling all audio aspects of a live show. The 72-fader, 96kHz system offers the reliability of distributed pathways, redundant routers, dual stage boxes, multiple DSP engines and a separate control computer on each of its five console bays for fail-safe operation. It runs over a standard Ethernet physical layer, but uses a proprietary MidasNET protocol with low, ideal-for-IEM latency. Stack-for-more-I/O stage boxes each include 24 remoteable mic preamps with three analog mic splits linked to 96 channel inputs (plus 16 mic/line aux ins).


MIDAS XL8 LIVE PERFORMANCE SYSTEM
May 2006—Midas unveiled its long-awaited XL8 Live Performance System, which goes beyond the duties of a digital console, providing an open-architecture, cross-platform, integrated audio control and distribution system for handling all audio aspects of a live performance from a single control center. Midas’ emphasis was creating a high-performance, 96kHz system with the reliability of distributed pathways, redundant routers, dual stage boxes, multiple DSP engines and a separate control computer on each of its five console bays for fail-safe operation. Everything runs over a standard Ethernet physical layer, but uses a proprietary MidasNET protocol, which avoids Ethernet packeting to offer low, ideal-for-IEM latency (said to be 0.4 ms after six hops and a total A/D of less than 2 ms). The stack-for-more I/O stage boxes each include 24 remoteable mic preamps with three (recording/broadcast/monitor) analog mic splits linked to 96 channel inputs (plus 16 mic/line aux ins). Color-coded controls, 72 faders, single-function paging knobs, and high-res, daylight-view TFT screens are included for ease of use.


MIDAS SIENA
March 2005—Unveiled at Winter NAMM and available in frame sizes from 24 to 64 channels, the Midas Siena console features 16 aux sends (reconfigurable as stereo pairs), preamps/four-band EQ based on the flagship XL4, switchable insert points on all outputs and a unique solo tracking system that allows the soloed outputs to be shown on Klark Teknik’s Helix EQ system.


MIDAS VERONA 8-BUS
April 2004—Midas enters the mid-level market with Verona, an affordable, analog 8-bus with six models from 24 to 64 inputs. Group/aux switching allows any aux outputs to be controlled via a 100mm fader with insert point for an easy switch-over from FOH to monitor duties. Other features include premium mic preamps, sweepable 4-band EQ, eight aux buses, 12×4 matrix, four mute groups, all balanced outputs, optional redundant PSU and more.


MIDAS HERITAGE 4000
January 2004—The Midas Heritage 4000 console builds on the foundation of its TEC Award-winning Heritage 3000 and takes it to a new level. Designed for FOH or monitor duties, or both, the H4000 adds eight more stereo auxes for a total of 40 aux sends. It’s available with 48, 56 or 64 inputs, which can be loaded with any combination of stereo/mono modules. Inputs feature the XL4 Preamp and the H3K EQ; all inputs have direct outs, and eight matrix outputs can be picked up from any bus output. For familiarity, the H4000 shares all of the automation, muting and VCA functions of the H3000. There are 10 VCAs, 10 mute groups and virtual fader automation on all input and VCA group faders. Mutes are also under automated control, and scene storage is split into Act and Scene—a useful designation for theater users. The H4000 uses the same power supplies as the H3000, with dual supplies for redundancy. Rental companies will appreciate that the H4000 modules can be used in H3000s (although not vice versa).


MIDAS LEGEND 3000
January 2002—The Midas new Legend 3000 provides two independent mixers in one for separate FOH and monitor control throughout: two faders per channel and six EQ filters, 12 auxes and 10 VCAs that can be assigned to either fader. With eight subgroups, six matrixes and four stereo effects returns, it comes with 24, 32, 40 or 48 channels ($29k to $42k list). Mic pre’s are derived from the XL4; EQ comes from the XL3. Snapshot automation will be compatible with the Heritage 3000 so it can be used as a sidecar.


MIDAS LEGEND SERIES DEBUTS
September 2001—Midas announces the Legend Series of live mixing consoles. Debuting with the Legend 3000, the series features a semi-modular console constructed in blocks of eight, each of which is split into three sections. Preamp circuitry is derived from the Midas XL4, and EQ is based on that in the XL3. Further, every input channel has two sets of EQ—one for monitors and one for FOH—as well as two faders for complete control over each mix. Additional features include 12 aux sends.


MIDAS B2000
June 2001—At NAB, Midas showed the B2000, the first in a line of analog broadcast mixers. The B2000 supports mono, stereo, LCRS, and 5.1 or 7.1 surround. AES/EBU I/O converters are optional, as is an A/V router interface and snapshot automation. The B2000 is available in 24- to 72-channel frame sizes (both mono and stereo input modules are offered), and other features include a limiter per input; the popular Midas EQ; six aux buses (talent monitors); eight mix-minus buses for news talent feeds; eight stereo subgroups (six become 5.1 master outputs in Surround mode); and dual-power supplies.


MIDAS HERITAGE 1000
April 2000—At AES Paris, Midas kicked off its 30-year anniversary celebration with the launch of the Heritage 1000 live performance console, offering a small footprint for applications where space is at a premium, such as theaters or remote trucks. Available in 24- to 56-input frames, the 1000 features XL4 mic preamps, the 4-band XL3 EQ, 10 aux sends, ten subgroups, input meters on all channels and a comprehensive 400-memory automation system with control of routing, auxes, inputs, subs, etc. An audio-follows-video option is available for broadcast applications.